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What Water Restrictions Mean for Your Yard - L.A. Landscaping During 2022 Drought in California

What Water Restrictions Mean for Your Yard - L.A. Landscaping During 2022 Drought in California

What 2022's Water Restrictions Mean for Your Yard

If you've grown up in California - Especially Southern California - you've spent your whole life hearing about droughts. Turn off the taps. Take shorter showers. Check for leaks. To me these always seemed like tiny little bandaids in the bigger picture of California's terrible water problems.  

So what are the biggest issues? Well, first there's agriculture (why are sprinklers still allowed to run in peak heat in the central valley?? Why do we sh*t in and flush with drinking water? Someone tell me why!) but that's another story that's largely out of our control.

And then there's residential landscaping.

Residential landscaping is the biggest water waster in Southern California. Most people overwater their yards by %30-50 ... either due to lack of knowledge, lack of oversight, leaking pipes or poor design. So water cutbacks aren't the worst thing. Because the plants that will die from them are not meant for this climate. 

California native, Mediterranean and succulent plants can happily survive with water once a week ...even in severe droughts like this one. If they're roots are in well draining soil and properly mulched. 

Read on for what you need to know about restricting your watering this summer. AND the easiest way to replace a landscape that can't handle the heat

Water Restriction Mandates & Your Yard

Sprinkler Watering is Once a Week ONLY.

Each water district varies slightly in their restrictions. But in general, any sprinkler irrigating is limited to once a week. NOW IS THE TIME TO replace sprinklers with drip irrigation. Most water districts offer decent rebates for converting to drip irrigation (click here to read about which ones). 

Drip Irrigation has some limits but not significant ones IF you are using emitters. Newly installed landscapes can be supplemented with hand watering. Read on for full details. 

ACTIVE WATERING RESTRICTIONS

Calleguas Municipal Water District: Ventura County, Camarillo Oxnard, Thousand Oaks

Inland Empire Utilities: Chino, Upland, Chino Hills, Montclair, Fontana, Ontario, Rancho Cucamonga

Las Virgenes: Calabasas, Westlake Village, West L.A., Agoura Hills

L.A. Water & Power: Los Angeles, Bishop, Culver City, South Pasadena, West Hollywood

Three Valleys: Claremont, San Dimas, Covina, Glendora, la Verne, Pomona, West Covina, 

Upper San Gabriel ValleyArcadia, Azusa, Baldwin Park, Bradbury, City of Industry, Covina, Duarte, El Monte, Glendora, Irwindale, La Puente, Monrovia, Rosemead, San Gabriel, South El Monte, South Pasadena, Temple City, West Covina


DRIP IRRIGATION RESTRICTIONS

You are allowed to water other days of the week if you are irrigation with DRIP EMITTERS ONLY (or inline drip omitters). This does not include bubblers, soakers, misters, etc. 

Graywater Use Permitted (wooo Laundry to landscape systems!)

Handwatering (hose in hand) permitted for establishing plants / newly planted landscapes. 

Unlimited watering with reclaimed water (purple cap sprinklers)

If You Still Have a Lawn

APPLY FOR A REBATE RIGHT now -> Click here to read our guide. Many rebates don't apply if your lawn dies. So you need to apply now. You may have to install your new yard this summer but getting a few thousand dollars (or up to $20k) should make the extra hand watering needed to get it through summer more bearable. 

If You Recently Put in New Landscaping

Make sure you are using drip emitters wherever possible. Apply for rebates from your local water municipality to improve the system if needed. HAND WATER (that means hose in hand, not attaching a hose to a sprinkler) where plants are struggling. If they are very drought tolerant plants,  less water might be better for them. 

If You Need to Convert to Drought Tolerant Plants 

Look for California native plants and Mediterranean climate plants that are adapted for dry summers and low water needs. Succulents and cactus work great. But so do many sages, herbs and small trees. 

Waiting until the cooler season (October - March) is the best time of year in California to install new landscaping. However, if you need to up your yard game NOW - whether it be for curb appeal, rebate needs or other - we can get you summer strong plants in as little as 5 days. Check out our preplanned garden packages by clicking on the image below

 





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